Garthdee Allotments

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Tag: sustainability (Page 2 of 4)

Gone to Seed Tarland Seed Swap 2018 Update

Planning is underway for the Tarland Seed Swap and Potato Day for 2018.

Most of the boxes of seed envelopes have now been distributed, so please collect some and bring along your seed to the seed swap. Locations are listed on the poster but there will also be a box of seed envelopes at Cruickshank Gardens. Don’t worry if you have not managed to save seed this year, you can still take some envelopes away and try them out.

We have some old favourites plus some new exciting potatoes this year:

First Earlies:
Organic Casablanca 
Organic Maris Bard 
Rocket   

Red Duke of York

Sharpes Express

Belle De Fonteney

 

Second Earlies:
Organic Charlotte 
Organic Maris Peer
Organic Nicola 
Shetland Black

Jazzy

Anya

 

Main:
Highland Burgundy Red

Organic Orla

Organic Lady Balfour

Organic Pink Gypsy

Sarpo Mira 

Organic Arran Victory

Mayan Gold

Mayan Twilight

Pink Fir Apple

Violetta

Ama Rosa

Ratte  

A real highlight is John Marshall, Scotland Potato expert,  who will be giving an introductory talk on “The Potato Story” at 10.30  and then running a workshop on Growing Tips and Diseases, suitable for more experienced gardeners at 12.00.

We really look forward to seeing you all there.

Lizzy

Gone to Seed

Trees and Bees Survey

The, It’s your Neighbourhood programme, had trees, bees and butterflies as a special focus this year and this prompted us to take a look at the trees and bees found on site.  We decided to conduct a little informal research and thanks goes to all who contributed ideas and information.

Our first report of interim findings is attached via the link below.  All comments, additions or corrections will be gratefully received.

GFAA_Tree_Survey

Diary date for seed lovers

This message arrived from Lizzy Shepherd of Gone to Seed.  I know many plotters visited and enjoyed the Tarland event last year.
_____________
I hope you are busy saving seed to share with your friends and to bring along to the 2018 Seed Swap and Potato Day being held in Tarland on Saturday 24th February.
So far I have saved carrot, mangetout, cutting celery and flat leaf parsley seed; hopefully, the leek seed will have time to fully ripen…not sure yet. The photo shows how attractive the carrot and leek seed heads look, it’s worth growing them just for that!
If you would like to get hold of some of the seed envelopes now, please drop me a line and I will try and see if we can get them to you. They will be available in a few locations early next year as well, or just bring your seed along on the day and put them into envelopes there.
In the meantime, there are some really useful clips below on how to go about saving seed and isolation techniques etc:
I hope that you find these useful. We will be running another seed saving workshop at the seed swap and potato day in 2018, so why not come along to that session and learn more.
Lizzy
Gone to Seed

Stunning!

Our wild flower area has been simply stunning for weeks now.

Thanks to everyone who helped with the hard work to get it re-established this year and especially Michael who kept faith with the original idea of a wild flower garden after the difficulties of our first efforts.

Be bee friendly …

One of the, “It’s Your Neighbourhood” priorities this year is that we plotters do as much as we can to encourage and protect our native bees.

It’s common knowledge that bees have been having a tough time of late.  They are vital to the success of many of our crops and it makes sense for us to give them all the help we can.  The Royal Horticultural Society  has a nice wee video that shows in four minutes just how easy it is to lend our bees a helping hand.

RHS suggests these simple steps to help our honey, bumble and solitary bees:

  1. Plant nectar and pollen rich plants – those with open flowers that give easy bee access.  Examples include Catmint, Lavender, Phacelia tanacetifolia and Sedum.
  2. Leave undisturbed some areas with naturally long grass, or at the base of bushes and hedges – these are the preferred, natural homes for bumble bees.
  3. Put up simple bee hotels for solitary bees e.g Mason Bees, in quiet spots around our plots and public spaces.
  4. Avoid spraying with pesticides as much as possible.
  5. Take up bee-keeping – if you have the necessary experience or get appropriate training.

On this last point, the City Council is reviewing its ban on bee-keeping on allotment sites and a new policy may be announced soon.

So, what could GFAA do to be bee friendlier?

 

 

Dear Plotters

The Its Your Neighbourhood theme for 2017 is “Birds, Bees and Trees”, and your committee has been pondering whether the site of the wildflower meadow can be reformed to reflect this theme.

Wild Flower Garden in Year 2

The meadow has been in place for 3 years, and the site was initially too rich to prevent grasses and weeds from overcoming the wild flowers. We have time this spring to rework this area (starting with digging out the current grasses and weeds), and would appreciate your ideas on what should replace it:

1 Wildflower meadow resown
2 Herbaceous border with bee-friendly flowers
3 Shrubs and perennial plants (bee friendly)
4 Set back to grass
5 Other (please specify!)

PLEASE RESPOND TO ME BY INDICATING THE NUMBER WHICH INDICATES YOUR PREFERENCE.

Replies appreciated if possible by end 31st March, so that we can prepare for action in the April Community Sunday.

Looking forward to your responses,

Best Regards

Michael Hart
Secretary – GFAA

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