Garthdee Allotments

the e-home of the Garthdee Field Allotments Association

Category: Advice (Page 1 of 5)

The season ahead

 

Our allotment site is looking good just now with the fruit trees in blossom, the grass cut and plots prepared with planting underway. Everyone does their best to keep their own plot and other parts of the site tidy and in good nick but just recently there have been occasions when clumps of weed and divots from some plot or other have been dumped at the bottom of the site and there have been several occasions when the overhead barrier at the site entrance has been left open overnight.

So this is a gentle reminder for all allotment holders and their helpers to observe the following good practice:-

a) Not dumping any unwanted material on site. If you don’t want it on your plot, take it away to the Council recycling depots or your domestic waste bins or ask a Committee member to help you dispose of material if you’re having difficulty.

b) If you open the overhead barrier, make sure you close it when you leave. It would also be helpful if you’re last out in the evening to put the chain across the entrance.

c) Make sure your plot is numbered and that the number is visible from the access tracks.

Thanks to all those anonymous plotters and volunteers who help out in their own quiet way, filling potholes, picking up litter and generally contributing to the upkeep of the site for the benefit of all us who use the allotments.

Here’s hoping we all have a rewarding growing season.

Polytunnel Guidelines

Thanks go to Susan (Plot 35) who has kindly updated our Polytunnel Guidelines for the 20128 season.  The Guidelines are available from the Advice Tab at the top of our Homepage or directly via this link.

Priscilla

 

RHSA Gardening Workshops


Managing Your Allotment – Guidance Notes

In December 2017 Aberdeen City Council issued an updated set of guidance notes for plotters called, “Managing your Allotment”. The new version contains updated information on, e.g. ponds, polytunnels and keeping bees.   For your convenience, you will find a copy of this document under the Advice Tab at the top of our Homepage. Or you can follow this link.

Manure Deliveries

Happy New Year Plotters,

If you have been to the site recently, you will have noticed that a full 10 Tonne load of cow dung has been delivered to the Primary School Plot.  This is for use in the Community Garden.  Please do not use it for other purposes. However, another full load for use by plotters has been ordered and we expect delivery to the top of the site in the course of this month (January).

This second 10 Tonne load will be for the use of all GFAA plotters.  In the first instance, please take only a barrow load or two for use on your plot.  This is to make sure that everyone gets a fair allocation for a start. More may be available later in the year.

A New Year Resolution

It’s time to declare war on New Zealand flatworms – total war. For me, they have replaced slugs as public enemy number one. Slugs only attack some of the crops we grow. NZ flatworms threaten to annihilate our earthworms.  They are also as ugly as sin and ooze evil from every pore.  There can only be one plotters’ response – EXTERMINATE!

Bruce on flatworm patrol

Why so now? I suggest two reasons. Firstly, a recent Conversation Newsletter Article (link coming up below) spelt out the importance of earthworms for healthy soil and plants, and the environment generally: and we all know the threat NZ flatworms pose to our earthworms.  In summary, the article says earthworms are:

  • brilliant organic matter recyclers and wormcasts contain key nutrients
  •  tireless engineers improving soil structure and condition
  • good indicators of soil health and toxicity levels
  • a food source for many species, so adding to biodiversity
  • expert restorers of damaged or neglected soils.

Earthworms are the good guys and our friend’s enemies are our enemies.

Secondly, research shows that some modern practices and tendencies in plot management seem to favour the NZ flatworm.  For example, I have started to use plastic membranes and carpet as weed inhibitors and winter soil protectors and these are known to encourage flatworms.

It seems unlikely that we will ever be able to completely defeat and remove our flatworms.  Recent Aberdeen University research reports (links below) show that flatworms are present on 70% of our plots and 90% of Slopefield’s plots are infested. However, there are lots of actions we can take to reduce flatworm numbers.  This may tip the balance back in favour of our earthworms.

Actions against NZ flatworms include:

  • removing clutter and flatworm refuges from our plots.  These are flat stones, plastic, wood, carpet and fabric
  • set up flatworm traps using the above and check them on a regular basis
  • kill trapped flatworms with lemon juice or drowning in salt water in secure containers
  • add organic matter to encourage earthworms
  • use grass paths to support earthworms
  • exercise strict bio-security to avoid spreading flatworms to new areas

When our plots were surveyed by researchers they found that flatworm refuges were found on many plots. Eighteen plots had a small number of refuges; 14 plots more than a small number; 14 had many refuges and only 1 was refuge-free.  The number of flatworms found increased with the number of refuges and carpet was found to be the worst source of flatworms, followed by plastic, fabric, stones and wood in that order.

So what is to be done?  In the first instance, I am going to stop using carpet to suppress weeds. I am going to do a big Spring tidy up, removing clutter. I am going to set my flatworm traps and check them regularly. I already keep a lemon squeezy on site.  I should also replace my central slab path (built up over many years as free slabs became available) with a grass one, but this is a big job and a sore one.

Know your enemy

So, I hope this can be a big focus for us over the year ahead.  If you want to read more about the NZ flatworm threat and responses these links will help:

Conversation Newsletter Article

GFAA Advice Notes

Report on GFAA Flatworm Study

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