Tag Archives: City Council

Aberdeen in Bloom Competition

Stuart

Application forms for the 2017 competition are now available and entries have to be returned got to be returned to Aberdeen City Council by 14 July.  We have always been big supporters of the City’s, Britain in Bloom efforts and I hope we will see the usual big entry from plotters this year.  A good level of entries helps show how keen we plotters are on our allotments and the Council’s work to support green spaces and gardening.

Plotters can pick up an entry from from the Bothy or from Council offices and libraries.  Alternatively, you can submit your entry online via the Aberdeen in Bloom Page.

I hope we will see a bumper crop of entries this year!

Plot Security Advice

Pat Wilson has forwarded this advice from Police Scotland.

Security

When looking at issues surrounding security always take into consideration the following three points:

APPROPRIATE – If the risk is small a simple solution will be appropriate, the higher the risk the more that will need to be implemented

REALISTIC – Make sure that whatever you suggest or implement tackles the problem or any foreseen problem

COST EFFECTIVE – The cost of whatever you suggest or implement should be in proportion to the risk and affordability

Fencing

The fencing at the allotments is actually more of a physical deterrent rather than a definitive security barrier. In order to completely prevent anyone from climbing into each allotment, a great expense would have to be paid for substantial fencing. This is not realistic or cost effective. There are some measures that you can put in place to protect your fence.

A close wire mesh fence can be difficult to climb and offers good protection. Wooden panel fencing is generally a good barrier. If putting up a wooden panel fencing nail a strip of galvanised wire along the panels at a height of a third and two thirds up the fence. On top of that attached some mesh or heavy netting to further protect the fence. A further, more extreme, measure may be to connect every panel to the posts with coach bolts to make removal more difficult.

Barb wire* (or similar) along the top of fencing. The police advise against the use of such methods of intruder prevention due to the risk of legal action if someone is injured. Of course, it is not only intruders and trespassers who risk being injured by barbed wire or broken glass. Householders owe a much greater duty of care to anyone on the property with permission.

Anti-climb paint can be painted along the top of the fence. Anti-climb paint is also known as anti-vandal, anti-burglar, anti-intruder or anti scale paint. It is basically a thick glutinous paint with a similar appearance to smooth gloss paint however when applied it does not dry and remains slippery indefinitely so preventing an intruder from gaining a foothold. However not only does it not dry it is also extremely difficult to remove from clothing so acting as an excellent deterrent to possible intruders. This makes anti climb paint a very simple, economic and effective way of protecting your property from intruders. Please note that anti-climb paint should always be applied at least 2 metres above normal access height and its presence should be clearly indicated with warning signs, it is generally accepted that warning signs should be displayed at no more than 3-4 metre intervals and in a position where they are easy to read

Prikka Strip* – is a plastic strip of spiky platy spikes Property owners must satisfy themselves that no harm will be caused by these products and should display a warning notice advertising that an anti-intruder device has been fitted. http:// www.prikka-strip.co.uk/

Shed – For information on shed and outbuildings security then please go tohttp:// www.scotland.police.uk/keep-safe/home-and-personal-property/secure-your- garden-and-outbuildings. Always carefully consider what you keep in your shed? How valuable is it? How would I cope, how would I feel if it was stolen?

DON’T KEEP VALUABLES AT THE ALLOTMENTS

For further advice on home and personal security then visit http:// www.scotland.police.uk/keep-safe/home-and-personal-property/

*Plotters are reminded that the Council prohibits the use barbed wire and similar devices on our site.

Recycling Plant Pots and Seed Trays

Some recent news from Pat at the Council:

Please find information detailed below via Adrian Atkinson, Representative, Holburn Street, to share with the plotters at your sites.

You may be aware that the Council has started to roll-out mixed recycling facilities and this includes some things that couldn’t previously be recycled locally – including ‘plastic pots, tubs and trays’. I’ve checked with the ACC waste team and this includes plastic plant pots and trays so they can now be recycled rather then put into rubbish for landfill. The new service is currently being rolled out for premises that have on-street recycling/rubbish bins – i.e. flats and tenements, with individual houses to follow at a later date but it does mean that you might have a mixed recycling bin nearby (as we do in Ferryhill) that you could use. Check this link for more details.

http://www.aberdeencity.gov.uk/waste/waste_recycling/waste_onstreet_mixed_recycling.asp

Regards

Pat

Pat Wilson
Project Support Officer

Blooming Britain!

GFAA were part of a Council group at the Duthie Park representing Aberdeen City in the Britain in Bloom competition today.  Along with a dozen or so other organisations we were invited along to evidence gardening activities in the City.  The judges were very interested to hear of the development of the Primary Plot, our activities with RGU, the planting up of the South Bank and our losing battles with the deer.

IMG_0346

IYN Preparation 2016

Stuart2016 marks GFAA’s third year in the It’s Your Neighbourhood Scheme. We achieved a Thriving assessment at our first go and now we have an Outstanding ranking to defend in 2016 after our success last year.  Outstanding is the highest award possible. Taking part in IYN has been a source of good advice on growing, the environment and building a better community, but just as importantly, it has helped us open doors to getting more external funding for our site and facilities.

This last month Norman and I took part in a workshop to help us prepare for this year’s assessment.  It’s an important year as 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of Britain in Bloom.  The workshop was hosted jointly by IYN, The Royal Horticultural Society and Aberdeen City Council.

Juliette Camburn hosting and appearing for IYN

Juliette Camburn hosting and appearing for IYN

Stephen Shaw for Aberdeen City Council

Stephen Shaw for Aberdeen City Council

Liz Stewart for RHS

Liz Stewart for RHS

Karen Allan for Aberdeen City Council

Karen Allan for Aberdeen City Council

Some of the key messages for our preparation included:

  • keeping in touch and seeking advice
  • using online resources from IYN and RHS
  • using print and digital comms to get our message across
  • have a vision of where we want to go
  • marking the 50th Anniversary in some way
  • building partnerships with others
  • seeking Council officer and elected member involvement
  • celebrate our successes and good news stories locally and nationally
  • get all ages involved
  • use the council media office to help with the press
  • think about sustainability and long term vitality
  • don’t stand still and get stuck in ruts.

So, we have lots to get on with then!  I and any of the committee members will welcome all suggestions and discussions about our key developments and plans for the future – and of course help to prepare our site for the upcoming IYN Assessment visit.